the Polish prairie

The Bielowieza forest is surrounded on the Polish side by farmland, much of which is hayed for dairy cattle.  Polish farmers seem to prefer haying their meadows of grasses and forbs, rather than planting monocultures of alfalfa.  As a result, forest visitors (the human variety) are treated to a colorful scene of perennial blooms, very similar to that we see in Minnesota prairies, only with a lot more color.

http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2017/06/ravens-remember-people-who-suckered-them-unfair-deal?utm_source=newsfromscience&utm_medium=facebook-text&utm_campaign=ravensremember-13457

We were amazed to find a number of the same species present in Polish prairies as we might find along roadsides in the U.S.  Of course we call these weeds, and perhaps they are in Poland, too. Or perhaps they really are part of the natural prairie mixture.

Oxeye daisy

Oxeye daisy looks the same in the Polish prairie

Prairie near Bialowieza forest

Wild carrot, hawkweed, brome, and timothy are similar constituents in Polish and U.S. Prairies

White stork, prairie near Bialowieza forest

Of course the birds are quite different. In a Minnesota prairie, if I spotted a long-legged bird in the prairie, it would probably be a Sandhill Crane. In Poland, the long legged birds are likely to be White Storks, the ones that bring all the Polish babies…

White Stork, Poland

Prairie wagon, near Bielowieza forest, Poland

And the mode of travel through prairies is different too. We don’t have any of these nifty wagons in the U.S., unfortunately.

2 thoughts on “the Polish prairie

  1. “The ones that bring all the Polish babies…” You had me laughing this morning, Sue. I love the shots of the prairie, with all of the wonderful flowers, and, of course, the images of the stork. It sounds like a fabulous trip with lots to see.

    • Thanks, Mike. This is quite an expedition, with way too many photo ops. I’ll have to just hit the highlights briefly over the next couple of weeks.
      You’re about to see a whole new world–clearly. Best wishes!

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