What a bird!

I went looking for the nesting Great Horned Owls at Silverwood Park the other day, but found only the one owl (female?) sitting in the nest box with just the tips of her “horns) showing.  Not much to photograph there.  However, there was quite an amazing “bird” elsewhere in the park.

An eagle (?) metal sculpture prominently displayed in the middle of a snowy field surrounded by oaks.

An eagle (?) metal sculpture prominently displayed in the middle of a snowy field in the park.  For scale, this sculpture probably stood about 5 feet high and about 6 feet long.

Since I used to teach comparative anatomy, I was intrigued by the parts the sculptor used to represent parts of the bird’s anatomy.

The magnificent head of this regal eagle. One eye was bright yellow, the other was bright red.

The magnificent head of this regal eagle. One eye was bright yellow, the other was bright red. The lower beak looks like a broken garden implement perfectly juxtaposed against the very large top beak.  A shovel blade and car fenders complete the top part of the bird.  Does anyone know what was used to form the back of the head and throat area?

The shoulder joint is formed from a circular saw blade and fender.  A staggered array of golf club handles make up the primary flight feathers.  I'm not sure what it is that forms the outer edge of the wing with that row of bolts.  The blade of a shovel forms the scapular feathers of the back.

The shoulder joint is formed from a circular saw blade and car fender. A staggered array of golf club handles make up the primary flight feathers. I’m not sure what it is that forms the outer edge of the wing with that row of bolts.  The tip of a downhill ski forms the trailing edge of the wing.  The blade of a shovel forms the scapular feathers of the back.

Sturdy legs formed from ornate metal table legs

Sturdy legs formed from ornate metal table legs and talons made of circular coils rest on the pronged structure that supports the entire sculpture.  The tips of a pair of crutches make up the longest primary feathers in the wings, and metal rods trail down the back to form the tail.

What a bird!

NOTE ADDED:  The artist of this piece is Al Wadzinski.  “Wadzinski creates zoomorphic assemblages using found objects of every material – valuable, mundane, cast-offs, delicate or impermeable, reclaimed from salvage yards, garage sales and alleys.”  Find more Wadzinski artwork here.

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