It’s spring!

You wouldn’t know it, from the low temperatures, incessant cloudiness, and persistent drizzle, but yes, it’s spring, and a few brave flowers have shown up.  And a few birds have successfully reproduced despite freezing temperatures.  But quite a few birds have unfortunately been unsuccessful this year.  One person reported seeing bluebird eggs frozen to the bottom of the nest box, due to extreme low temperatures and lack of insulative material with which to construct nests.  I think we have gone beyond normal and are verging on an abnormally cold spring now.  This summer is looking shorter and shorter.  My peonies still haven’t gotten bigger than the size of a dime.  OK, enough complaining.  The winners of “it’s spring!” are:

I wish I could say this was growing in my bakcyard, but this lady slipper orchid was found at the Eloise Butler Wildflower Garden.

I wish I could say this was growing in my backyard, but this lady slipper orchid was found at the Eloise Butler Wildflower Garden in Minneapolis.  These are rare in the wild, but grow well in other people’s backyards.

This wild lupine used to be very common.  Its decline is linked to the disappearance of the Karner blue butterfly.

Wild lupine used to be very common. Its decline is linked to the disappearance of the Karner Blue butterfly, since it is the only host plant for the caterpillar.

Dame's Rocket is an introduced plant, and it can become weedy.  But its fragrant magenta and white flowers are a welcome sight in spring.

Dame’s Rocket is an introduced plant, and it can become weedy. But its fragrant magenta and white flowers are a welcome sight in grassy meadows and forest edges.

This Canada Goose nest was high enough to avoid the flooding that washed out nests of other geese.

This Canada Goose nest was high enough to avoid the flooding that washed out nests of other geese. A cold, rainy May was hard on many early-nesting birds.

This bunch of goslings looks well tended by protective parents.

This bunch of goslings looks well tended by protective parents.

3 thoughts on “It’s spring!

  1. The lupine and the dames rocket highlight the importance of gardening with native plants. How pretty is an invasive that doesn’t host a butterly?

  2. That’s a beautiful orchid!
    Those lupines are a pretty blue: we have nothing like them here, but we have several other lupine species. I wonder what it is about that butterfly being linked only to that particular species of lupine.

Please Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s